Contact Us  >Coronavirus (COVID-19): Business as usual - we can still provide all our services while observing social distancing rules.

If you're a homeowner or an individual that has recently bought a piece of land or maybe you're planning on buying some land to build on, it's important for you to be aware of the laws and legalities surrounding planning permission and everybody's favourite beast from the east, Japanese knotweed! 

As Japanese knotweed is classed as an intrusive plant here in the UK, there are a number of laws that surround the eastern Asian plant which may impact on your ability to extend your house or build one altogether. To make things a little clearer, let's take a look at some of these laws and what impact that may or may not have on your chances of gaining planning permission.

Japanese knotweed and planning permission

 

Planning Permission with Japanese Knotweed 

For individuals considering planning permission for their property, it is essential that the checks are conducted for the presence of Japanese knotweed. If carried out and there is a suspicion that the plant is present, it is vitally important that a survey is requested by an ecological surveyor. If its presence is then confirmed, a control programme suitable for the site in which the property sits will need to be planned as part of the planning application, which includes the safe removal of the knotweed. Planning conditions to ensure the control programme is performed sufficiently should be imposed.

Planning Conditions 

Planning conditions are imposed on sites where Japanese knotweed is known to be present in order to prevent the spread of the invasive plant, which under the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 is an offence. Japanese knotweed is notorious for devaluing sites, as well as causing major structural damage to any buildings which may be developed on contaminated land. A management plan will need to be put into place which contains a number of the following things:

  • The objective of control action 
  • An assessment of control options
  • Criteria for completion 
  • Advice on preventing spread around site 

 

So, despite all of the hysteria surrounding Japanese knotweed, planning permission is still possible if found near your property! However, a stringent and effective plan to manage it must put into place before work can be carried out. 

If you have reason to believe that Japanese knotweed is present on your premises and require experienced professionals to assess and remove it, then do not hesitate to get in touch with Taylor Total Weed Control today for our expert Japanese knotweed removal services! 

Japanese Knotweed Removal > 

 

Any keen gardeners will have heard about Japanese knotweed supposedly having the ability to break through strong, impermeable materials like concrete. Can Japanese knotweed actually grow through concrete? Well, not exactly...

Japanese knotweed is one of the most relentless plants that will happily invade and spread through your garden, causing lots of damage as it goes. But, it's not strong enough to force its way through solid concrete slabs or walls.

That being said... Japanese knotweed is notorious for finding its way through small cracks and holes making it appear as though it has broken through all kinds of stony surfaces on its own!

The root of the problem:

Like any other plant, Japanese knotweed needs sunlight and water to grow. This means that it will take advantage of any crack or hole big enough to fit a trickle of water or a ray of sunshine down! Japanese knotweed's complex root system will send new shoots out to all of these available places, which is why our problem with this weed is so widespread. 

Getting rid of Japanese knotweed:

Unfortunately, most people's efforts to eradicate the plant themselves do not work, simply because destroying the visible plant will barely impact the complex root system underground. To tackle Japanese knotweed efficiently, you really need an expert team to deal with the weed.

Here at Taylor Weed Control, we have years of experience dealing with Japanese knotweed all over South Wales - so we're sure we can help you! Read more about our Japanese knotweed removal service here:

Japanese Knotweed Removal >

Identifying Japanese knotweed can be a challenge on its own, you may have noticed some pesky weeds poking up through the paving around your garden. If you're not sure what they are, or how to get rid of them properly, contact us for a FREE lawn survey!

Request a FREE Lawn Survey >

How Do You Get Rid of Japanese Knotweed

In September 2018, the Independent reported that Japanese knotweed had knocked nearly £20 billion off the value of the UK property market, with an estimated 850,000-900,000 properties affected nationwide.

Why does this particular weed pose such a big problem? Well, Japanese knotweed is exceedingly difficult to get rid of. Not just because the plant's rhizome root system can sometimes burrow a full 2 metres down into the ground, but also because a tiny fragment of those roots can sprout into a whole new stem.

This allows Japanese knotweed (once beloved by UK gardeners for its resemblance to bamboo) to spread to new sites at a truly alarming rate - ironically, many attempts to destroy the weed only end up helping it to take root elsewhere!

So, if you're sat around asking how do you get rid of Japanese knotweed, the professionals here at Taylor Total Weed Control are here to help!

 

We don't recommend trying to remove Japanese knotweed yourself.

Japanese knotweed is recognised by British authorities as a highly invasive non-native plant, and there are certain laws in place to keep it from spreading. For example, Japanese knotweed is classed as 'controlled waste', meaning that it can only be disposed of at specially licensed landfill sites.

As mentioned above, attempting to eradicate Japanese knotweed by yourself can backfire and make the problem even worse, so it's generally wise to call in a Japanese knotweed removal specialist to assess the situation and determine the best course of action.

 

Japanese Knotweed Eradication

Broadly speaking, there are two ways to get rid of Japanese knotweed:

  • Herbicide - Spraying the plant's leaves with herbicide is generally the most cost-effective solution. Herbicide application should take place over several years to ensure the best possible results.

  • Excavation & Disposal - The other option is to use excavation machinery to dig up the affected site, after which the knotweed can be disposed of at one of the aforementioned licensed landfill sites. This is by some distance the more expensive and disruptive approach of the two, but it may be preferable if you're on a deadline.

So, when it comes to getting rid of a knotweed infestation on or near your property, you have the two above choices. Whicher you decide to use will ultimately depend on your preference in terms of time and disruption.

 

How we can help get rid of your Japanese knotweed infestation

Here at Taylor Total Weed Control, we provide specialist Japanese knotweed removal across South Wales and South West England that ensure any confirmed case of knotweed on or around your home is dealt with in a professional and effective manner.

So, what are you waiting for!? To get rid of your Japanese knotweed, get in touch with our expert team today before it's too late!

Request a FREE Knotweed Survey >

If you’re reading this blog, chances are you’re familiar with the horticultural horrors of Japanese knotweed. If this wicked weed wraps its weedy tentacles into your home’s foundation, the results can be devastating for your house and, worse still, catastrophic for your finances.

plants that look like japanese knotweed

Japanese knotweed young stems by Scottish Invasive Species Initiative is licensed under CC BY 2.0

However, not all suspected cases of Japanese knotweed are actually the real deal. In fact, the villainous vine has many doppelgangers and most instances of suspected knotweed are merely a cases of mistaken identity.

So, before you take a flamethrower to your back garden and bulldoze your house completely, it’s important to know that you are indeed dealing with the legit Nipponese knot and not a floral facsimile.

 

Plants Commonly Mistaken for Japanese Knotweed

Annoyingly, there are a wide variety of plants that look like Japanese knotweed. As such, identifying Japanese knotweed can be a tough task and a lot more difficult than you may think.

Plants commonly mistaken for Japanese knotweed include:

 

Bindweed

Baring heart-shaped leaves like its Japanese twin, this also has a rapid growth spurt when it first appears in the springtime.

However, unlike Japanese knotweed, Bindweed isn’t capable of supporting itself and, instead, makes its vertical ascent by coiling itself around the stems of other standing plants.

It also boasts large flowers in the summertime, clearly differentiating itself from traditional Japanese knotweed.

 

Russian Vine

Much like Japanese knotweed, Russian Vine has similar looking leaves and flowers, while it is also fast-growing.

On the other hand, it is also similar to Bindweed in that it relies on other plants to grow upward, twisting and climbing around the stems of taller, more solid vegetation.

 

Bamboo

The most widely known of its contemporaries, bamboo grows tall like knotweed and also has visible nodes on its stem, making the two very similar in appearance.

That being said, bamboo stems are considerably more dense than its Asian brethren and boast a strong sturdiness lacking in Japanese knotweed. Bamboo leaves are also notably narrower and longer.

 

Broadleaf Dock

Part of the same family, Broadleaf Dock shares numerous characteristics with Japanese knotweed, from its arrangement of leaves to the spiky shape of its flowers and stems.

However, this plant is typically shorter than Japanese knotweed and contains a foamy substance in its stem, clearly visible when cracked open.

 

Other plants that resemble Japanese knotweed include:

  • Ground Elder
  • Himalayan Balsam
  • Himalayan Knotweed
  • Himalayan Honeysuckle
  • Lilac/Woody Shrubs

 

How to identify Japanese knotweed

So, having met its countless counterfeit counterparts, how do we know when knotweed is not the weed we know?

The answer to that riddle is “with great difficulty”. The real plant itself has a varying appearance depending on the time of year and can be extremely difficult to detect and delineate, particularly during the winter months.

When it comes to identifying Japanese knotweed, many homeowners will head straight to the internet for inspiration. The web can be a great tool to help you spot Japanese knotweed; however, it’s important to remember that this method is far from fool-proof.

As we’ve seen, looks can be deceiving and your worst garden nightmare could actually be nothing to worry about at all. Think of it as the gardening version of self-diagnosing an illness online; while the web can be a great resource, it’s no substitute for a knowledgeable professional.

If you suspect your home is under attack from the pesky plant of the Pacific, your best option is to call in the experts. With over 15 years of experience, Taylor Weed Control is a leading specialist in Japanese knotweed control; not only can we accurately separate Japanese knotweed from its lookalikes, we can also treat and remove your unwelcome garden guest accordingly.

We will match any written quotation from a PCA-registered Japanese knotweed removal company.

Contact Taylor Total Weed Control

 

From calculators and karaoke to sushi and sumo wrestling, Japan has given many gifts to the outside world. Sadly, knotweed is not one of them…

Japanese knotweed grows thick and fast with roots strong enough to break through tarmac. If neglected, it can cause havoc beneath the surface of your property.

Worse still, typical home insurance policies won’t cover damage caused by Japanese knotweed. While this does mean your insurance premiums may be unaffected, it does mean you are left to foot the removal bill.

In this blog, we take a closer look at the pesky plant from the East and answer a common question among homeowners, "does Japanese knotweed affect insurance?"

More...

Contact Taylor Weed Control

Name *
E-mail address *
Location *
Telephone Number *
Your Message
 
Security Character Security Character Security Character Security Character Security Character Security Character
Enter Letters (No Spaces) *
Security Character Security Character Security Character Security Character Security Character Security Character