japanese knotweed swansea

Japanese knotweed is an incredibly persistent, invasive plant that can be found in gardens across the UK - Swansea included! It tends to favour damp areas, so if you're walking around Swansea, it's likely that you'll see it cropping up on land near the pier, along embankments and in the hedgerows.

Of course, seeing it grow in the wild and public areas of Swansea is fine - it's only when you suspect it might be encroaching on your own property that it becomes an urgent concern!

Japanese knotweed will spread very quickly if you leave early signs untreated and although it favours damp areas, it can grow almost anywhere (nowhere is safe!).

If you have a severe Japanese knotweed problem on your hands and you don't get it under control before it spreads, there are all kinds of nasty repercussions. You could be prosecuted, your property could be damaged or you could have real difficulties selling your home

I think I have Japanese Knotweed on my Swansea Property!

Don't panic! Japanese knotweed can be incredibly difficult to get rid of, even tiny rhizomes left in the soil can sprout into a secondary infestation - but you don't need to tackle the problem on your own. 

We have an expert team of Japanese knotweed removal specialists with decades of experience operating in the South Wales area. They will be able to get the intrusive plant under control before it has the chance to spread. Here's what we recommend you do:

  • Submit an enquiry form
  • Have your lawn/garden surveyed for FREE by our team
  • Sit back, relax and let us deal with your Japanese knotweed problem!

Request a FREE Survey >

Find Out More About Japanese Knotweed & Our Removal Service: 

As Japanese knotweed specialists, we can help you identify, understand and effectively remove it before it spreads throughout your property and into the rest of Swansea! Luckily, we have a whole section of our site dedicated to Japanese knotweed, so to find out more, simply click the button below!

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If you have any questions about removing Japanese knotweed from your Swansea property, please don't hesitate to get in touch with us. We can be contacted via telephone on 029 2039 7554 or you can email us at sales@taylortwc.co.uk.

Grounds maintenance Bristol

Need an expert to look after your grounds? Whether it's a commercial business park, a full-size football pitch, or something else entirely, the team here at Taylor Weed Control are more than up to the task!

Our grounds maintenance services are available in Bristol and other parts of South West England (including Somerset, Gloucestershire and Worcestershire). We carry out weed control and maintenance for a variety of different clients, including:

  • Those who require a full, comprehensive maintenance service on a regular basis

  • Those who need specialist, one-off assistance with a problem they haven't encountered before (e.g. a moss invasion)

  • Those with unusual / bespoke requirements

Whatever you need, we will make sure that your pitch or grounds look picture perfect, no matter the season!

Our Grounds Maintenance Services >   Contact Us Today >

Japanese knotweed, the term that strikes fear into many homeowners. However, homes aren't the only buildings and structures that can feel the effects of the presence of Japanese knotweed, businesses can too. That's why it is extremely important for business owners to understand how Japanese knotweed can impact their commercial premises and what options are available to them when it comes to eradicating the pesty plant. 

 

Commercial Procedures

If you are planning to build or develop on land that contains Japanese knotweed, the choice of a 5-year management plan via herbicides is unfortunately not an option. This is usually a result of time constraints from construction workers, planners, resources and finances. Where there are plans for development, The Environment Agency advises that for the complete eradication of Japanese knotweed, the entire rhizome needs to be removed from the soil. Especially when the ground is likely to be disturbed and moved during the construction, building and extension of commercial premises, as the spreading of rhizomes is extremely sensitive.

How Can We Help?

Taylor Weed Control is committed to assisting all business owners with their commercial Japanese knotweed removal requirements. As a result, we provide all our commercial clients with professional services which are bespoke to their requirements and individual needs. From the initial point of contact, we will provide a thorough and detailed process which will include an initial assessment of your commercial premises, future plans for development, time scales, the identification of potential applications that have to be submitted and finally the most cost-effective means of Japanese knotweed removal.

The Process:

  1. Identification of Japanese knotweed 
  2. Survey 
  3. Report & quotation 
  4. Management plan 
  5. Completion 

Do you require our commercial Japanese knotweed removal services? Don't hesitate to get in touch with Taylor Weed Control today for a FREE survey or learn more about our service by hitting the buttons below! 

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Transcript: How to Prevent Japanese Knotweed from Spreading

If you think there is a risk of Japanese knotweed on your property it is ABSOLUTELY VITAL that you prevent it from spreading into neighbouring gardens and beyond! Failure to prevent Japanese knotweed from spreading can lead to:

  • Prosecution and a fine of up to £5,000!
  • Extensive damage to your property
  • Difficulties trying to sell your home

How does Japanese Knotweed Spread?

Japanese knotweed has a reputation for being incredibly persistent. It tends to find a way around most conventional methods of weed control, so special care has to be taken to control or remove it properly before it spreads.

It commonly spreads if:

  • You use infested top soil on your lawn
  • You allow contaminated vehicles onto your property
  • You leave early signs untreated

Solution:

  • Always buy your top soil from a reputable supplier
  • Brush or jet wash contaminated vehicles before leaving an infested area
  • Treat early signs of Japanese knotweed right away!

Spotted Japanese Knotweed on Your Property?

Here’s How to Deal With it:

Burn it

  1. Dig up as much of the Japanese knotweed as you can.
  2. Leave the Japanese knotweed canes to dry out.
  3. Burn them!
  4. Dispose of remains properly – rhizomes may survive the burning process.

Bury it

  1. Dig up as much of the Japanese knotweed as you can
  2. Cover it in a root barrier membrane so that it won’t be able to re-establish underground.
  3. Choose an area of your own land to bury the remains.
  4. Dig a hole at least 5m deep & bury.

Leave it to the Experts!

  1. Head to taylor-weed-control.co.uk/japanese-knotweed-removal.
  2. Request a FREE lawn survey & speak to our team about your Japanese knotweed problem.
  3. Arrange a date for us to attend your property.
  4. Sit back, relax & let us do the rest!

To prevent Japanese knotweed from spreading you need to treat it sooner rather than later! Our Japanese knotweed team have over 15-years of experience in preventing Japanese knotweed from spreading – call Taylor Weed Control on 029 2039 7554 today!

Can you get in trouble with the law if you have Japanese knotweed in your garden? Technically, no. There is no legal obligation to remove Japanese knotweed from your own property, however, you MUST NOT:

  • Let Japanese knotweed grow or spread into the wild.
  • Allow Japanese knotweed to spread from your garden into neighbouring gardens.

Failure to comply with either of these laws can lead to prosecution, a fine and/or imprisonment. Therefore, it is important that you put a proper plan of action in place if you do notice Japanese knotweed on your property.

Currently, there are no regulations stating Japanese knotweed infestations need to be reported, however, reporting the problem & notifying neighbours can prompt them to check their own gardens for signs of Japanese knotweed and get the problem resolved quickly. 

Are there laws about treating Japanese knotweed?

The most effective way of treating Japanese knotweed involves the use of pesticides. Anyone who chooses this method of treatment is bound by The Control of Pesticides Regulations 1986 to ensure that all the necessary precautions are made to protect other human beings, animals and plant life. 

Applying pesticides can be quite difficult for a gardening novice, particularly if the Japanese knotweed is in a high traffic family garden or near to an open water source. It's hard to know how much pesticide contamination is 'too much' if you've never treated invasive plants like this before. 

Here at Taylor Weed Control, we always recommend leaving the treatment of Japanese knotweed to the professionals. We have been dealing with this invasive plant for over a decade, so we can get the job done quickly and efficiently without damaging the surrounding environments.

We can offer you a FREE, no obligation lawn survey to establish the extent of your Japanese knotweed problem, then we can treat it for you. This way, you won't have to concern yourself with the legalities of Japanese knotweed.

Request a FREE lawn survey >   Japanese Knotweed Treatment >

The infographic below provides a brief overview of all the common lawn weeds that we have come across throughout South Wales and the South West over the years. Some are more damaging and more difficult to get rid of than others, so we have provided essential information about each that you will need to know! 

Infographic Transcript 

Ephemeral Weeds

This weed type tends to have more than one life cycle per year, therefore ordinary weed killers are not particularly effective. The word ‘ephemeral’ means transitory or quickly fading, referring to the unique growth strategies exhibited by these types of weeds. In each of these growing strategies, the ephemeral weed has a life cycle timed to exploit a short period when specific resources are freely available such as low waters and wet periods.

Groundsel

  • Grows 5-22cm high
  • Lobed leaves & small yellow flowers
  • Sets seed within 4-6 weeks
  • Seeds germinate throughout the year apart from midwinter

Hairy Bittercress

  • Compact plant growing 3-5cm high
  • Tiny white flowers
  • Sets seeds within 4-6 weeks
  • Weed of cool moist conditions – improving drainage will help control

Chickweed

  • Grows 5-7cm high
  • Vigorous spreading habit with small white flowers and an extensive root system
  • One of the most common ephemeral weeds
  • Set seeds quickly – germinate easily in damp soil

Annual Weeds

These types of weed grow and flower in a short period of time. They tend to seed in the winter and come back throughout various times in the year, living for only one season, hence why they are given the name ‘annual’. The trigger for these types of weeds often come from a few wet days during Spring. Take a look a some of the most common annual weeds below.

Fat Hen

  • Grows up to 27cm high
  • Broad leaves with small indistinct green/white flowers
  • Found on rich soil – seedlings germinate in dense patches
  • Seeds persist for a long time and will germinate readily

Yellow Oxalis

  • Grows around 5cm high but it a prolific seeder
  • Seeds are dropped from barely visible pods before even noticing its presence
  • Once present will multiply very quickly
  • Often found in nursery plant pots

Prickly Milk Thistle

  • Can grow up to 90cm high – often smaller
  • Pale yellow flowers
  • Seeds set in as little as four weeks if the plant is in a dry and shaded place
  • Strong taproot, making it difficult to remove when established

Perennial Weeds

These types of weeds are persistent and prone to becoming more and more challenging as time goes on. Perennial weeds appear every year from the same plant and are difficult to get rid of. Many have deep roots which need to be removed but once this is done, smaller regrowth can be handled in an easier manner. These weeds have the ability to cause a great deal of disturbance to your lawn and garden.

Dandelion

  • Can take 6-9 month to remove by digging out small roots
  • Remove as much as parent root as possible to avoid the possibility of re-grow
  • A common weed which spreads easily, they are valued for their medicinal properties and culinary use
  • Leaves are diuretic which cleanses the liver, provide rich mineral content

Dock Leaf

  • Look a lot more difficult to remove than they actually are
  • Slicing through the tap root about 6 inches down and removing as much as possible will often stop it from re-growing
  • Once seed heads mature, large clusters of brown seeds are produced – best burnt
  • Friends as well as foe – Soothes skin stung by nettles by rubbing on affected area

Bramble

  • Always look far more difficult to remove than they actually are
  • Often grows with a tangle of long thorny stems
  • Remove all stems initially and then remove the root
  • Mulching helps after the ground has been cleared

 

These are just a selection of the common lawn and garden weeds you’re likely to find on your property. If you do happen to come across any of these weeds or any other weeds that you may be unsure of, be sure to visit our website https://www.taylor-weed-control.co.uk/ for more information on our weed removal services!

When it comes to maintaining a healthy garden, moss can be a real pain in the grass.

Typically found in damp or shady locations, these dense, greeny clumps of matted mess can be a real blemish to an otherwise beautiful lawn.

Think of it as a beer stain on a dark suit – it won’t ruin the whole thing completely but you know it’s there and you could definitely do without it.

Luckily, there are a few ways you can combat your garden’s fuzzy feature. Maintain lawn and order on your property with these handy hints and tips on lawn moss control.

 

lawn moss control

 

How to get rid of lawn moss

The best time to remove moss from your lawn is during the spring and summer months. This allows your garden to prepare/recover from the summer period, where it will be at its peak in terms of growth.

Moss doesn’t fare well in iron-rich soil… which is great if you have high levels of iron in your soil. For those that don’t – which, if you’re reading this, probably means you – giving your mossy tenant a dose of iron is a great way to ensure it has a rocky stay.

Now before you begin pouring gallons of Guinness all over your lawn, there is an easier way to supplement iron. Besides, that’s a colossal waste of perfectly good Guinness – save that for a celebratory toast to a job well done later on.

Most lawn moss killer products typically contain iron sulphate, so a simple spray of any good moss killing agent should provide more than enough iron to give your green enemy a hard time. Think of it as Iron Man battling the Incredible Hulk… only far less exciting and a lot more one-sided.

 

Easy moss removal techniques

Another great method of moss removal is one that will be easily achievable by any self-respecting homeowner. Everyday washing-up liquid is something that any household should have readily available and can also make for an efficiently excellent moss killer.

It’s recommended that you use around 50ml of washing up liquid with 4.5 litres of water (for smaller patches, reduce measurements accordingly). From there, mix well and spray using a garden sprayer, being mindful not to drown the area. Spray the moss patch until there is visible run-off and let nature take its course.

Additionally, moss isn’t great with lime either, so adding lime to your sprayer may also be helpful in eradicating your unwanted garden guest. This will make the soil less acidic, which is more favourable to grass as well.

Ideally, try to time these methods so that they don’t coincide with an impending spell of rain, as this will likely dilute the formula and reduce the effectiveness of the treatment – putting a literal dampener on your mossy mutiny.

 

lawn moss control

 

The root of the problem

Dead or dying moss will soon turn bronze in colour before drying up completely. Moss has very shallow roots so, once it turns orangey brown, simply rake over the auburn excess and let the healthy grass take back its patch.

However, while the above methods can be great solutions to your moss problems in the short term, they may not solve your garden gripes in the long run. You could simply repeat the previous steps ad nauseum; however, there’s no guarantee this will stop the moss from returning time after time.

If there’s an underlying issue that is causing moss to grow in the first place, this is something that needs to be addressed in order to prevent it from rearing its ugly head once more.

 

How to prevent lawn moss

You can prevent lawn moss growth in a number of ways, from mowing technique and scarification to sufficient fertilisation and healthy water coverage. However, for peace of mind, why not get in touch with us for some expert advice on moss treatment?

At Taylor Weed Control, we specialise in moss control and know exactly how to identify, treat and rid your lawn of its unwanted eyesores, once and for all. We even use specialist fertilisers unavailable to the general public to ensure your lawn gets a new lease on life – moss-free!

 

Cure your mossy headaches today with a FREE moss treatment survey! Hit the button below for more details.

Get in Touch Today!

 

Okay, first things first, just what are perennial weeds?

As the name so accurately suggests, perennial weeds are simply troublesome vegetation that recur regeneratively time and again with a seemingly infinite frequency (i.e. perennial in nature).

These persistent little pests can be a major headache for gardeners and make for an ugly addition to an otherwise perfect flower bed. Without proper treatment, these troublesome weeds can crop up year after year like a botanical bad penny.

If knowledge is power then it’s time to take the power back, as we take a closer look at Britain’s most common perennial weeds.

 perennial weeds

Common Perennial Weeds UK

Ranging from the humble dandelion to the common buttercup, perennial weeds can come in a whole host of shapes, sizes and, of course, species.

Naturally, some are a little easier on the eye than others and sadly not all weeds will take the form of the aesthetically pleasant buttercup – which is all the more reason to give your soily squatters a speedy eviction.

Here are the five most common perennial weeds you may see in and around your garden.

 

Bramble

Featuring long thorny stems, brambles can grow up to 2m high. While they can feature clusters of white or pink flowers during the spring/summer, they are most recognisable by their fruit – the blackberry!

Thistle

Thistles are commonly found in two varieties: the spear plume and the creeping thistle. The former is relatively easy to deal with, while the latter is far more troublesome. Characterised by dark pink/purple flowers at the top of the stem, the creeping thistle is both easily spread and hard to unroot.

Bindweed

Boasting eye-catching white flowers, this somewhat pleasant-looking weed can be very misleading. Beneath the service, its roots can burrow very deep and are frustratingly brittle, making them almost impossible to remove whole.

Nettle

Commonly used for tea, soup and even smoothies, nettles can be a helpful weed to have around – particularly if you are adventurous in the kitchen. However, they can also be potentially hazardous due to their stinging hairs and can grow wildly out of hand if left to themselves. The roots can become a tangled mess beneath the surface, while the plant itself can grow to over a metre in height.

Dock

While dock leaves are famed for their soothing qualities in neutralising nettle stings, docks are still deemed weeds themselves. If left to mature, dock seeds are produced in abundance and can spread easily. Worse still, dock seeds can survive in soil for up to half a century!

 perennial weeds

Dealing with Perennial Weeds

So, just how do we give these weedy perennials an everlasting burial?

Like most problems in the garden, this is one problem that can be solved by rolling up your sleeves and getting your hands dirty. If you don’t happen to have any sleeves, now's the time to get changed – ‘cos it’s time to roll them up and get in the dirt!

The most effective way to weed out these perennial pains is to go straight to the source and get to the root of the problem… that being the roots. Unfortunately, most perennials weeds have roots that spread deep and wide, so ridding your soil of its outstretched tentacles can be a tough task. Tough but not impossible.

Physically pulling them out is a wise place to start; however, this may not be possible for weeds with brittle or stubborn roots. If yanking doesn’t get the job done, another way to deal with your weedy invader is to give the area a good old-fashioned forking. If available, it’s also a good idea to use a hoe and plough thoroughly.

Outrageous innuendos aside, yanking, forking and hoeing are the holy trinity of removing/destroying most perennial weeds. If the roots aren’t removed entirely, the damage done from the trauma should break up any remains, preventing regeneration. However, it's important to remember that this is a general rule of thumb and each weed may require its own particular approach.

If you still need assistance or aren’t sure how to deal with your particular case of perennial weeds, it may be worth considering chemical warfare in the form of weedkillers; however, if this is the case, it may be easier (and safer) all round to simply call in the experts.

 

For more information on weedkillers, treatments and general weed removal tips, why not drop us a line or enlist our team of experts to remove your problem plants for you?

Call today on 029 2039 7554 or hit the button below to contact us for a free survey now!

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If you're a homeowner or an individual that has recently bought a piece of land or maybe you're planning on buying some land to build on, it's important for you to be aware of the laws and legalities surrounding planning permission and everybody's favourite beast from the east, Japanese knotweed! 

As Japanese knotweed is classed as an intrusive plant here in the UK, there are a number of laws that surround the eastern Asian plant which may impact on your ability to extend your house or build one altogether. To make things a little clearer, let's take a look at some of these laws and what impact that may or may not have on your chances of gaining planning permission.

Japanese knotweed and planning permission

 

Planning Permission with Japanese Knotweed 

For individuals considering planning permission for their property, it is essential that the checks are conducted for the presence of Japanese knotweed. If carried out and there is a suspicion that the plant is present, it is vitally important that a survey is requested by an ecological surveyor. If its presence is then confirmed, a control programme suitable for the site in which the property sits will need to be planned as part of the planning application, which includes the safe removal of the knotweed. Planning conditions to ensure the control programme is performed sufficiently should be imposed.

Planning Conditions 

Planning conditions are imposed on sites where Japanese knotweed is known to be present in order to prevent the spread of the invasive plant, which under the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 is an offence. Japanese knotweed is notorious for devaluing sites, as well as causing major structural damage to any buildings which may be developed on contaminated land. A management plan will need to be put into place which contains a number of the following things:

  • The objective of control action 
  • An assessment of control options
  • Criteria for completion 
  • Advice on preventing spread around site 

 

So, despite all of the hysteria surrounding Japanese knotweed, planning permission is still possible if found near your property! However, a stringent and effective plan to manage it must put into place before work can be carried out. 

If you have reason to believe that Japanese knotweed is present on your premises and require experienced professionals to assess and remove it, then do not hesitate to get in touch with Taylor Total Weed Control today for our expert Japanese knotweed removal services! 

Japanese Knotweed Removal > 

 

Any keen gardeners will have heard about Japanese knotweed supposedly having the ability to break through strong, impermeable materials like concrete. Can Japanese knotweed actually grow through concrete? Well, not exactly...

Japanese knotweed is one of the most relentless plants that will happily invade and spread through your garden, causing lots of damage as it goes. But, it's not strong enough to force its way through solid concrete slabs or walls.

That being said... Japanese knotweed is notorious for finding its way through small cracks and holes making it appear as though it has broken through all kinds of stony surfaces on its own!

The root of the problem:

Like any other plant, Japanese knotweed needs sunlight and water to grow. This means that it will take advantage of any crack or hole big enough to fit a trickle of water or a ray of sunshine down! Japanese knotweed's complex root system will send new shoots out to all of these available places, which is why our problem with this weed is so widespread. 

Getting rid of Japanese knotweed:

Unfortunately, most people's efforts to eradicate the plant themselves do not work, simply because destroying the visible plant will barely impact the complex root system underground. To tackle Japanese knotweed efficiently, you really need an expert team to deal with the weed.

Here at Taylor Weed Control, we have years of experience dealing with Japanese knotweed all over South Wales - so we're sure we can help you! Read more about our Japanese knotweed removal service here:

Japanese Knotweed Removal >

Identifying Japanese knotweed can be a challenge on its own, you may have noticed some pesky weeds poking up through the paving around your garden. If you're not sure what they are, or how to get rid of them properly, contact us for a FREE lawn survey!

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