Japanese knotweed cropping up anywhere, especially near your home, can be a real cause for concern. If you spot Japanese knotweed on council land near your home, you need to make sure you report it as soon as possible.

We're sure you already know how quickly Japanese knotweed can spread, and it could show up on your land in only a few weeks if it's left unchecked! Ok, let's not panic too much. Here are the steps you should take to report Japanese knotweed on council land.

Head to your local council's website

The first thing you should do is check out your local council's website. Some council websites have a section dedicated to Japanese knotweed, and you should be able to report the problem there. Failing that, you should be able to find their contact details so you can tell them about the Japanese knotweed over the phone or via email. 

What if the knotweed has spread to my property?

If you notice that the knotweed has spread from council land to your property, you should be able to put in a claim back the money you spend on having it removed. Make sure you take lots of photos, as you may need to submit a request for the local council to treat the problem. They can also help back up your story if you have to take the council to court.

Here at Taylor Weed Control, we offer a professional Japanese knotweed removal service that can help you get the problem under control before it gets any worse. Waiting for the council to organise appropriate treatment can take weeks or months, in which time, the Japanese knotweed may have caused significant structural damage or spread to surrounding properties.

Planning to take legal action against the council? We can help with that too. Our expert witness service ensures you have proper documentation of the problem and aid you through the court case. We carry out a confidential survey of the Japanese knotweed, prepare the necessary reports for your solicitors and can provide you with a cost estimate for treatment if required.

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What Japanese knotweed laws do the council have to abide to?

Any organisation, whether it's a local council or a housing association, are subject to the same Japanese knotweed laws. These laws state that allowing knotweed to spread from your land to someone else is illegal and can be prosecuted as a private nuisance. 

If you've spotted Japanese knotweed on council land, get in touch with the council, then get in touch with us! We can help you get the problem under control quickly. If you have any questions, don't hesitate to email us - sales@taylortwc.co.uk.

 

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