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who can remove Japanese knotweed

Removing Japanese knotweed is not a task that should be undertaken lightly. Japanese knotweed is a fierce and unrelenting invasive species that can re-emerge from tiny particles left in the soil. For that reason, it's important that you only employ trained Japanese knotweed technicians to treat your infestation. Working with the right people, who will do a good job of killing and removing Japanese knotweed will save you time, money and heartache.

Who is responsible for treating Japanese knotweed?

The primary legislation for Japanese knotweed is 'section 14(2) of the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981’. This states that the person who owns the land with the Japanese knotweed infestation is responsible for preventing the spread onto neighbouring lands. It's not actually a legal obligation for you to remove the offending knotweed, however, left untreated, it will no doubt cause problems for you and neighbours later down the line. The best course of action is to have Japanese knotweed treated and removed professionally as soon as you identify it!

What's involved when treating Japanese knotweed?

Japanese knotweed can be treated in a few different ways. Most often, it's sprayed with a mixture of specialist chemicals which kills the plant above ground and the roots below ground. Then, the soil is excavated to remove any trace of knotweed.

Guidelines set out by the government suggest that anyone wanting to use specialist chemicals to treat Japanese knotweed must do the following:

  • Make sure anyone spraying holds a certificate of competence for herbicide use or works under the direct supervision of a certificate holder.
  • Carry out a Control of Substances Hazardous to Health assessment.
  • Get permission from Natural England if the area is protected.
  • Get permission from the Environment Agency if the plants are near water.

Choose companies with accreditations

If you're not sure who can remove Japanese knotweed and who can't, we'd recommend getting in touch with a professional Japanese knotweed removal company (like ourselves). Companies that specialise in Japanese knotweed removal are likely to have a number of accreditations that show they are competent in handling & removing this invasive species. 

Here at Taylor Total Weed Control, we have a number of Japanese knotweed accreditations including:

  • PCA certification - which shows we follow strict standards and offer a high level of technical knowledge and skills.
  • Environmental Agency - we work alongside the environmental agency to ensure that all of our 'land waste' is disposed of properly.

Take a look at our full list of accreditations here.

Professional knotweed removal service

Looking for professional Japanese knotweed removal? Look no further. We have a team of technicians who can all remove Japanese knotweed efficiently. We've been dealing with Japanese knotweed across South Wales and South West England for several years, so we're sure we can tackle your infestation. Don't waste your time with cowboy knotweed removers, stick to people who can remove Japanese knotweed properly.

Japanese Knotweed Removal >

If you have any questions about our Japanese knotweed services, or if you'd like to book a consultation, give us a call on 029 2039 7554. We look forward to hearing from you!

Read More: Do You Need a Licence to Remove Japanese Knotweed?

Since its introduction to the UK in the 19th century, Japanese knotweed has been a real nuisance for people, businesses, buildings and the environment. As a result of its devastating and invasive nature, it has caused hundreds of thousands, maybe millions of pounds worth of damage to roads, infrastructure and local ecosystems, resulting in tremendous amounts of repair work and logistical nightmares.

This has lead to several legislative movements with laws put in place here in the UK to control the spread of Japanese knotweed, focusing on how it is stored, destroyed and reproduced. Since these laws have passed, people and businesses across the UK now understand how they are able to manage knotweed and what options are available to them if they were to come across, but are these laws the same across other countries?

We’re here to find out! So, read on to learn about how Japanese knotweed is controlled and managed throughout the world.

globe

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Throughout history, invasive plant and animal species that have been introduced to certain locations around the world have caused both micro and macro ecosystems to crumble. Without any natural predators, these new species are often left to cause irreversible damage that results in entire habitats being completely destroyed as well as communities being hampered with costly damage. 

For those of you who don't know, an invasive species can be any kind of living organisms such as fish, insect, amphibian, fungus or plant that is introduced to an ecosystem that they are not part of and proceed to cause harm and/or damage to the surrounding environment, economy or human health. Species can also be classed as invasive if they grow and reproduce at a fast rate, spread aggressively and carry the threat of causing harm. 

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Last month, the Daily Mail reported that a homeowner in Buckinghamshire had found Bohemian knotweed (Fallopia x bohemica) growing in his garden. Stuart Marshall from Aylesbury ended up calling in an invasive weed specialist to remove this troublesome plant from his property.

Bohemian knotweed leaves

Image source: Wikimedia Commons

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Horsetail, also known as marestail or Equisetum arvense to the Latin speakers among us, is a common perennial plant that grows up and down the country. Easily spread and difficult to kill, horsetail is one of the more awkward weeds to control. Even a small amount of horsetail can spread very easily and quickly throughout your garden. Here, the roots spread far and wide while the plant itself reproduces using spores rather than seeds.

However, despite horsetail being a nuisance when it comes to removal, it can be done! This blog looks at the methods of horsetail removal and how Taylor Total Weed Control can help you if you have horsetail in your garden. 

Horsetail in the garden

Image: Pixabay

Traditional methods of weeding such as slashing and mowing have very little effect on removing horsetail completely due to new stems developing from the roots left behind. This often leaves many gardeners and homeowners frustrated by their unwanted presence.

Issues with horsetail begin during the spring when greenish-brown shoots appear from the ground. These shoots are tipped with small cones that produce spores which spread the plant even further. Therefore, it's best practice to try and control the shoots before they begin to spore.

As horsetail roots being to creep throughout the ground, however, they become quite difficult to spot due to their colour being very similar to working soil and often end up spreading much further than most people realise.

Attempting to dig up the roots before the plant develops isn't very feasible either due to the root systems reaching depths of up to 1.5m! Once the stem has created spores, horsetail starts to develop small, thin leaves throughout the plant that last throughout spring and summer before dying off in late autumn. 

Despite the leaves dying off, the roots remain intact meaning the plant will begin to reappear the next and the cycle starts all over again. 

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Here in the UK, we have a long list of non-native invasive plant species that cause a myriad of problems. In some parts of the UK, planting, importing, selling or allowing certain invasive species to grow is punishable by up to two years in prison, so it's important that you know your natives from your non-natives before you start planting your flower bed.

When you come across a new plant in your garden, it can be difficult to know if it's an invasive species and (if it is) what you should do about it. Today we're going to take a closer look at some of the most common invasive weeds in the UK to find out a little more about them. Hopefully, this guide will help you identify and eradicate invasive weeds on your property before they have time to do any damage!

Japanese Knotweed (Fallopia Japonica)

Of course, at the top of our list had to be Japanese knotweed. Noted as one of the most widespread and destructive invasive plant species in the UK, Japanese knotweed can find its way into your garden and cause damage to your home in a matter of a few weeks.

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What to Do If You Find Japanese Knotweed Infographic

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The term "invasive species" may not sound very threatening, but these invaders, both large and small, can and do have devastating effects on wildlife and communities across the world.

What is an Invasive Species

Invasive species are one of the most threatening problems to native wildlife, with approximately 42% of endangered species at risk as a result of invasive species. Endangered species aren't the only things that are at risk due to invasive species, however, with economies and human health also susceptible to feel the effects. The impact that invasive species have on our natural ecosystems and economy cost billions each and every year, with many of our recreational, agricultural and commercial activities heavily reliant on healthy native ecosystems. 

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Map of Europe

As its name suggests, Japanese knotweed (Fallopia japonica) is native to the Far East. Once upon a time, this plant was to be found only in Japan and neighbouring territories like Korea and China.

Now, as we've previously discussed, Japanese knotweed wasn't - and still isn't - much of a problem in its homeland, simply because the local ecosystem keeps the plant in check.

But at some point, somebody had the bright idea of bringing Japanese knotweed over to Europe, where it was able to run rampant and cause all kinds of problems for us Westerners.

Read More: What Damage Can Japanese Knotweed Do?

This raises the question: just who do we blame for bringing Japanese knotweed to Europe?

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china

Today we take a look at a type of knotweed found not too far from its troublesome cousin Japanese knotweed - Chinese knotweed (Reynoutria multiflora). 

This plant is a flowering species that actually belongs to the buckwheat family! Found predominantly in (you guessed it) mainland China, it looks deceptively like Japanese knotweed in more ways than one. It features:

  • Tall woody stems that could be mistaken for bamboo
  • Broad arrowhead leaves
  • Greenish-white flowers that grow on dense panicles

Sounds a lot like Japanese knotweed right? Well, one thing that this plant produces that we don't see in Japanese knotweed is a fruit. The fruits of the Chinese knotweed plant are small, dry one-seeded fruits that do not open, also known as achenes.

In one of our blogs, we explored the benefits of Japanese knotweed, and it turns out Chinese knotweed has lots of medicinal uses too! In fact, reynoutria multiflora is a very popular perennial used in traditional Chinese medicines. 

The Chinese refer to the plant as he shou wu or fo-ti, and unlike Japanese knotweed in this country which is seen as an unwanted, invasive species, they cultivate it for ornamental purposes and for use in medicines. This type of knotweed grows in abundance, and here's why..

dried chinese knotweed

Medicinal Uses

This wonderful weed is said to restore virility and vitality in those who consume it, working on the reproductive, circulatory and urinary systems as well as the liver. 

The roots and stems boast a wide range of properties that make this weed a one-stop medicine shop! When ingested, they can work as a sedative, a laxative an anti cholesterolemic or as a treatment for menstrual or menopausal problems (to name but a few of its many uses). 

It's even been reported that people who take the rhizomes for a long period of time experiencing a darkening in their hair!

Besides the wide range of internal uses, Chinese knotweed can also be applied externally to treat conditions like ringworm, and its antibacterial properties mean it can even be used to clean open wounds and sores. You can read more about the medicinal uses of Chinese knotweed here.

So it's fair to say that Chinese knotweed is somewhat more respected and cherished in the community that its Japanese cousin! With that in mind, if you do happen to see Japanese knotweed encroaching on your property, request a free survey and we'll help you get it under control.

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