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knotweed sniffer dog

We all know that dogs are capable of some remarkable things, they can lead the blind, aid police officers and provide therapy for sick patients. Well, the talents of the canine don't stop there! Did you know they can also detect Japanese knotweed?

A Start-Up Company in Ireland

Helga Heylen founded her start-up company back in 2018 and has been training dogs to detect Japanese knotweed with incredible accuracy. Heylen claims that one of her sniffer dogs is able to detect the Japanese knotweed rhizomes even if they haven't broken the surface of the soil yet!

Using their powerful noses, the dogs are able to identify the exact location of a developing knotweed problem. Heylen currently has three knotweed detecting dogs working for her, one is a purebred labrador and the others are labrador-beagle crosses. 

These amazing sniffer dogs can really transform the way that Japanese knotweed is detected and treated. Rhizomes as small as a fingernail can be laid dormant under the soil for a number of years before developing into a fully-fledged knotweed nightmare! If dogs can help commercial property developers, home and business owners to quickly find and treat the problem, it could prevent a huge amount of structural damage later down the line. 

How Do These Dogs Work?

Unlike humans, dogs don't need to be able to see the knotweed to know it's there! They have a keen sense of smell that can identify rhizomes several metres under the ground. They can quickly move through over-grown terrain and don't need bright lights to work. This means they can quickly survey abandoned areas of land that humans simply couldn't access on foot. 

Doggy Danger

While these dogs might sound like miracle workers to those of you with a knotweed problem, there are some people who do not feel so positively about them. While working in Belgium, one of Heylen's dogs was given poisoned food after it detected knotweed at the site of an upcoming commercial development. The discovery of the knotweed by the talented pooch delayed the development project, which was a source of frustration for investors. 

Since then, security for the dogs has been tightened to make sure nothing like this happens again. They sleep under security cameras and are kept indoors near to the handlers. Hopefully, they can continue to carry out their work unharmed from now on! Heylen said: "You know it's a good thing when it excites like-minded people, which is certainly the majority and really scares others".

If you think you could have a Japanese knotweed problem on your hands, we can't provide sniffer dogs, but we can provide a FREE expert survey and Japanese knotweed treatment plan.

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Do You Need a License to Remove Japanese Knotweed?

If you have spotted Japanese knotweed on or near your property and are wondering if you need a licence to remove it – in short, no you don't.

The legal standing surrounding Japanese knotweed across the UK varies. In England and Wales, the primary legislation relating to knotweed is ‘Section 14(2) of the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981’. In Scotland, this is still the predominant piece of legislation but in effect has been superseded by the changes which came into force with the ‘Wildlife and Natural Environment (Scotland) Act 2012’. The law surrounding the management and control of knotweed across the UK, however, is practically the same.

Japanese knotweed is categorised as an invasive species, and it is the responsibility of the owner of the land where it appears to prevent it from spreading into neighbouring properties or into the wild. The removal of Japanese knotweed must also be performed with extreme due care and attention due to the sensitivity regarding its ability to spread. Currently, there is no legal obligation to remove or treat knotweed, just as long as you’re not encouraging or allow it to grow.

Guidelines set out by the government state that anyone wanting to use chemicals to treat an infestation of knotweed must do the some or all of the following:

  • Make sure anyone spraying holds a certificate of competence for herbicide use or works under the direct supervision of a certificate holder

  • Carry out a Control of Substances Hazardous to Health assessment

  • Get permission from Natural England if the area is protected, for example, sites of special scientific interest

  • Get permission from the Environment Agency if the plants are near water

The use of pesticides and chemicals in treating Japanese knotweed is governed by ‘The Control of Pesticides Regulations 1986’ and required any person who uses a pesticide to take all reasonable precautions to protect the health of human beings, creatures and plants. Once knotweed has been treated with chemicals, it will have to be disposed of in the correct way. Off-site disposals fall under the ‘Environmental Protection Act 1990’, which states disposing of Japanese knotweed must be conducted by a licensed waste carrier as stated in ‘Waste Regulations 2011’ and disposed of within a licensed facility. Relevant transfer notes must be completed and stored. If knotweed has not been treated before off-side disposal and simply removed, then it is not classed as hazardous waste. If certain pesticides have been used, however, then the waste moves into the hazardous category requiring a consignment note as set out in the ‘Hazardous Waste Regulations 2005’.

In 2013, the UK government stated that any person that fails to control Japanese knotweed along with other invasive weed could receive an anti-social behaviour order. On-the-spot fines of £100 can also be issued, potentially rising to £2500 if prosecuted. Companies also face fines of up to £20,000 if prosecuted

Professional Knotweed Removal

It is highly recommended that, if you have Japanese knotweed on or near your property, you use experienced professionals who know what they’re doing. If not, you risk allowing the knotweed’s rhizomes spreading even further, causing not only potential increases in damage later on in time but prosecution for facilitating the spread of knotweed. So, to avoid any of these issues, be sure to get in touch with the team here at Taylor Total Weed Control! Our Japanese knotweed specialist can identify and confirm the presence of knotweed on your property and devise a relevant plan of removal to ensure it is properly eradicated. You can learn more about our knotweed removal services below.

Japanese Knotweed Removal >

If you have any questions regarding our Japanese knotweed treatment or removal, then please do not hesitate to get in touch with us today!

Japanese Knotweed History

Japanese knotweed is one of, if not the most invasive plant in Britain. As its name suggests, the plant is native to Japan, where it is known as “itadori”. One interpretation of this name is ‘remove pain’ which alludes to the plant’s painkilling properties and use in various medicines to treat a variety of ailments ranging from cardiovascular diseases, fungal infections and skin inflammations.

Knotweed’s young leaves and shoots, once peeled, are also edible and are consumed in various ways through the inclusion in various recipes. In the UK, however, Japanese knotweed is being used more frequently in food supplements as a result of its resveratrol content (also found in red wine).

In Japan, knotweed grows freely on mountainsides, volcanoes and open spaces, which is a little different compared to the UK. There, knotweed has natural predators that come in the form of invertebrates, fungi, ash deposits from volcanoes and an erratic climate. In Britain, however, there are no natural predators to limit the spread of knotweed.

The history of Japanese knotweed is not as simple as you may think. How did it get here in the first place? Why did it spread so vigorously? And why is it such a problem today? Let’s find out.

Introduction of Japanese knotweed to Britain

German physician, botanist, and traveller Phillip Franz von Siebold found Japanese knotweed growing on the side of a volcano and planned to use it as an ornamental plant that could be used in residential gardens. The discovery was widely celebrated and as such, was named the ‘most interesting new ornamental plant of the year’ by the Society of Agriculture and Horticulture at Utrecht in Holland.

In 1854, Seibold sent a shipment of various plants including knotweed to the Royal Botanic Gardens in Kew, which was then shared with the Gardens in Edinburgh. This is where the plant began to spread as is was then sold commercially by nurseries.

The main pattern of distribution of knotweed was through intended planting and distribution, although this was before its invasive and destructive capabilities were realised. Using watercourses and soil transported during construction and road-building, knotweed began to spread naturally throughout the UK.

However, Ann Connelly, an expert in knotweed, stated evidence from the 1960s that showed the plant had been deliberately placed in Welsh coal-mining valley as it was good for stabilising loose soil.

So why is it such a problem now?

It is only able to survive thanks to its deep root system, which is the main cause of the huge problems found within garden and properties all across the UK. With nothing to combat its spread, knotweed can grow unchallenged and to devastating effect.

At its most aggressive, the plant can grow up to 20cm per day, breakthrough concrete or tarmac with ease and push its roots 3m deep into the ground. It also has the ability to overpower almost all other plants, totally swamping them and preventing them from getting any sunlight.

Recent history & treatment trials

As a result of its destructive nature, it is now an offence under section 14(2) of the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 to “plant or otherwise cause Japanese knotweed to grow in the wild” and is now classed as “controlled waste" under part 2 of the Environmental Protection Act 1990.

This requires disposal at licensed landfill sites. On March 9th 2010, the decision was taken to release into the wild a Japanese psyllid insect, Aphalara itadori. Its diet is highly specific to Japanese knotweed and shows good potential for its control. Controlled release trials began in South Wales in 2016.

Japanese knotweed removal

Due to Japanese knotweed's history of spreading quickly and ferociously, it has become a huge problem for homeowners throughout the UK. It requires specialised treatment and removal by trained, qualified professionals. That's where we come in!

Here at Taylor Total Weed Control, we provide expert identification and removal services that ensure the Japanese knotweed on your property is in fact knotweed and is then properly eradicated. We offer a choice of two survey and treatment plans that you can choose based on the severity of your knotweed infestation, which you can browse below.

Our Japanese Knotweed Treatments >

 

For more information on our knotweed removal services, be sure to get in touch with a member of our team today. We’ll be more than happy to help!

A Welsh council’s decision to continue using a weed killer that has been linked causing cancer has been described as a ‘kick in the teeth for residents’.

Image: South Wales Argus

 

Torfaen council has decided to continue their use of a glyphosate-based weed killer on the invasive Japanese knotweed in a meeting this week, whilst continuing to monitor alternatives that are being developed. A motion to halt the use of the product and one to limit its use to preventing Japanese knotweed were both rejected before councillors voted to continue to continue using the glyphosate-based product.

A protest was organised out the council chamber in Pontypool ahead of the meeting, with campaigners urging council members not to vote for its continued use. In addition, around 700 people have signed a petition titled ‘stop spraying our towns with probable cancer-causing glyphosate’, which was presented to the council last year.

Councillor Fiona Cross who is a cabinet member for the environment said that there could be a ‘detrimental effect’ on the appearance of the county borough as well as structural issues if they were to stop using the weed killer without having a suitable alternative in place.

She also pointed out that the authority uses a low concentration substance which is endorsed by both the Welsh Government and European Union. Council leader Anthony Hunt backed up the previous statements saying the council must take a pragmatic approach but added that if a ‘better alternative’ was to become available, then the council ‘should look to use that.’

Independent councillor David Thomas, on the other hand, stated that the council should not take ‘unnecessary risks’ by using the weed killer and called for it to be scrapped. Councillor Elizabeth Haynes put forward a motion for the authority to stop using the product but an amended version was voted down. A second motion was proposed by Conservative councillor Huw Bevan, which called for the council to continue using the weed killer but not in ‘high public footfall’ areas.

Cllr Bevan said he understood there is ‘no other effective treatment’ for the invasive weed, but called for the authority to further limit the product’s use elsewhere. This motion was also rejected.

Campaigner Terry Banfield said the decision is a “total kick in the teeth for residents.”

 

Professional Knotweed Removal

Here at Taylor Total Weed Control, we provide professional knotweed removal services that eradicate the presence of Japanese knotweed from your premises. Depending on the severity of your infestation, we offer two types of treatment plans; herbicide application programmes or excavation and removal programmes – both of which are conducted in a sustainable and environmentally-friendly way. Click below to learn more.

Our Knotweed Treatments >

 

For more information on our professional knotweed services, be sure to get in touch with a member of the Taylor Total Weed Control team today!

Bohemian Knotweed

Image: The Property Care Association (PCA)

 

A warning has been recently issued regarding a destructive ‘hybrid’ plant, known as Bohemian knotweed produced as a result of cross-fertilisation between Japanese knotweed and Giant knotweed.

The Property Care Association (PCA) says reports of the hybrid plants are on the rise. Also known as Hybrid knotweed, the plant could become a real concern if it gains a foothold nationally.

Dr Peter Fitzimons, group technical manager of the PCA’s Invasive Weed Control Group stated: “Bohemian knotweed, although less common, has been around for almost as long as the better-known Japanese knotweed, but is not always recognised.”

“As a result, it has remained largely below the radar, but the reason for concern is that these hybrid plants can be even more vigorous than the parent plants.”

“We also need to be alert as, in other parts of the world where Hybrid knotweed is more common, they are seeing signs of fertile seed production, known as backcrossing.”

“If so, this could be a major concern for the future as the existence of seed-producing hybrid knotweeds may enable these plants to spread even more rapidly.”

Listed under Schedule 9 of the Wildlife and Countryside Act, Japanese, Giant and Hybrid knotweed are all deemed as invasive and potentially destructive plants. They are steadily becoming more of a nuisance to home and business owners up and down the country because of their ability to spread quickly via their rhizome network.

Fitzsimons added that “since the PCA formed the Invasive Weed Control Group in 2012, we’ve always maintained the position that whilst this plant is disruptive around buildings it can be brought under control using established techniques and processes.”

“However, its presence can impact on the ability to gain a mortgage and on the development cost of land. More research is needed to see what the impact is of Bohemian knotweed, but for now, we should be aware of the issue.”

If you have spotted Bohemian, Giant or Japanese knotweed near your home, and like many homeowners in the UK are worried about the potential impact these invasive plants can have on your property. Then please do not risk it and get in touch with us here at Taylor Total Weed Control.

We provide professional, effective weed control services that ensure knotweed is completely eradicated. You can find our range of knotweed treatment plans below.

Knotweed Treatment Plans >

 

For more information on Bohemian knotweed, invasive plants or our treatment plans, then please do not hesitate to contact us today!

Are you asking yourself the question - "can I grow bamboo in my garden?" You're in the right place, today we're going to answer all of your bamboo growing questions!

British homeowners are being warned to not grow bamboo in their garden due to the potential dangers that the oriental plant can bring, with experts likening the effects of bamboo to the notorious Japanese knotweed.

Due to its screening capabilities and use within outdoor privacy measure, bamboo is an extremely popular choice for homeowners up and down the country, particularly within urban areas. However, its abilities to become highly invasive and out of control mean it can cause unpredictable and irreversible damage. Which, unfortunately, was the case for one homeowner in Reading.

The unnamed homeowner was forced to unearth her entire garden after bamboo grew to several metres in height and began to spread right across her garden towards her property, damaging her patio in the process.

Various forms of bamboo exist, namely ‘clumping’ and running’ that can have negative effects on surrounding areas. In this case, the ‘running’ bamboo found within the homeowner’s garden started to grow a large network of root and ‘rhizomes’, wreaking havoc on the property.

The rhizomes of bamboo are capable of spreading up to 30ft and if left untreated, can spread across and invade neighbouring property posing a huge threat to the foundations of homes.

Just like Japanese knotweed, bamboo has the ability to strangle plots of land as a result of its capability to damage property, breach brick, patios and cause cracks in concrete. It is known to thrive in a variety of soils, environments and temperatures with little to no maintenance.

Experts have stated that if you do choose to house bamboo on your property to make sure you choose a clumping variety as opposed to the running types. It is also a good idea to ‘place it within a pot or bed which is lined with strong vertical root barrier designed to contain bamboo.’

A retired couple from Reading has said they were mis-sold their bamboo by a local nursery, stating they were promised it would not grow further than waist height and would not spread. However, the bamboo shot up and out damaging both the patio and approaching house.

Professional Removal Services

So to answer your question - "can I grow bamboo in my garden?" The answer is yes, but do so with caution! If you're worried about the effects of spreading bamboo, you might want to avoid growing it. However, Japanese knotweed is infinitely more concerning if it appears in your garden!

To ensure you’re not affected by the damaging effects of bamboo or Japanese knotweed, contact us to talk about professional removal. If you have spotted bamboo or knotweed on or near your property and want to act fast before major damage can be caused, then please do not hesitate to get in touch with a member of the Taylor Total Weed Control team. We have a number of treatment plans available for you to choose from.

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According to industry experts, invasive breeds of bamboo can be just as bad, if not worse than Japanese knotweed, in terms of its ability to spread underground.

In fact, invasive species of bamboo have rhizomes that can reach out up to 30 feet beneath the surface, crossing property boundaries and causing structural issues in the process.

 

bamboo Japanese knotweed

 

Me Ol’ Bamboo

Bamboo has long been a well-liked plant in the UK, presenting an aesthetically pleasing option that doubles up as a barrier, with its privacy boosting properties commonly used for screening purposes.

However, new information about the plant’s intrusive qualities – particularly if left to its own devices and uncontrolled – highlights the negative impact this once beloved addition can have on your garden and your property as a whole.

Bamboo species typically fall under two different varieties, namely “clumping” and “running”. The latter in particular is the one to watch out for as this is the species that features long, lateral rhizomes that can stretch out afar underground.

 

Bamboozling Classification

While bamboo isn’t yet categorised under the “invasive species” category, the damage it can cause to a property can be costly. Worse still, it’s natural ability to spread can also cause lead it to encroach upon adjoining properties, leading to disputes between neighbours as well.

Sadly, due to bamboo’s current official status as a supposedly non-invasive plant, there are no existing restrictions relating to bamboo. As a result, sellers are under no obligation to tell potential buyers if the plant has posed a problem in the past or is likely to pose a problem in the future.

 

Love Thy Neighbour

Mark Montaldo, Director of UK civil litigation firm CEL Solicitors, had this to say:

“Bamboo is a growing problem as, unlike Japanese knotweed, it’s not officially classed as an invasive species and there are currently no restrictions on planting it. Consequently, there has been an increase in the number of neighbourly disputes following the encroachment of bamboo across garden borders.

“I have acted for a number of clients who have taken legal action against their neighbour for nuisance caused as a result of a bamboo infestation where the offending party has had to pay significant removal costs and legal bills.

“Due to the increase in nuisance claims it is something that the mortgage companies are closely looking at and I wouldn’t be surprised to see them imposing lending restrictions on properties that suffer with bamboo infestations in the future.”

 

Weed Removal Services

As you can see, bamboo is no run-of-the-mill garden plant and can pose serious issues if left to its own devices. As such, tackling this issue early doors can be the difference between a quiet life and going to war with your neighbours down the line.

If you suspect you may be running into issues with bamboo on your property, Taylor Weed Control can help. We have over 15 years’ experience within the weed control game and are more than capable of chopping your bamboo woes down to size in a jiffy.

Bottom line: don’t wait to get your bamboo issues under control. Don’t delay, call Taylor Weed today and save yourself a shed load of hassle along the way.

 

For more information on the variety of weed removal services available at Taylor Weed Control, why not drop us a line today? Call now on 029 2039 7554 or get in touch online by clicking the button below.

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A housing estate in Sturrocks in Basildon could see the value of its properties take a notable hit following the increasing growth of Japanese knotweed in the area.

 

japanes knotweed house prices

 

Effects of Japanese Knotweed on House Price

Japanese knotweed has a dark and storied history in the property industry and is commonly vilified in the media as a fiendish and fearful infestation – and rightfully so.

The mere presence of the invasive plant can have a decidedly negative influence on house prices and, if left untreated, the knotty vine even has the potential to inhibit the structural integrity of the property.

As such, quick action is necessary and it's recommended that treatment begins as soon as a Japanese knotweed infestation is discovered. Sadly, such recommendation was not followed by Basildon Council…

 

Deaf Ears

Despite reporting the presence of Japanese knotweed to the local council for six months, residents of Basildon’s Vange estate have had to stand idly by and watch the growing problem escalate as their pleas have fallen on deaf ears.

 “It’s disgusting that the council isn’t dealing with this”, said local resident Caroline Baxter. “We all pay our rates and shouldn’t have to deal with this going on here.”

Another inhabitant of the area, Barry Jones, also took aim at the council with his remarks:

“I think the council needs to get its act together and fix this issue. If they had done something about it then, it would have been gone by now.

“I will be so angry if the plant damages my garden and or home. If it’s left too long the whole estate will be covered in it.”

 

Delayed Reactions

Mr Jones also went on to highlight the safety hazards that knotweed brings to the area, noting that “people have suffered burns and blisters from the plant in the past”.

Commenting on the situation, a spokesperson for the local council had this response:

“We recently identified a case of Japanese Knotweed in Sturrocks and it was added to our contractors spraying list and has had its first spray.”

However, with a six-month head-start, have the council left it too late to nip this issue in the bud? One thing is for sure, they have definitely not made their job any easier.

 

Japanese Knotweed Treatment

As we touched on earlier, the sooner you address the problem, the quicker you will overcome it. As such, early diagnosis and early treatment is a vital part of the process and can be the difference between widespread problems and wholesale relief.

You notice a Japanese knotweed issue on your property, a neighbouring property or in the locale, it’s well worth getting it checked out. As seen in this instance, the council have a habit of dragging their feet and the issue is only likely to get a whole lot worse.

At Taylor Weed Control, we are fully equipped to tackle your knotweed nuisance once and for all and can quickly and efficiently banish your Eastern enemy from whence it came. All it takes is a phone call!

 

For more information on Japanese knotweed treatment from Taylor Weed Control, why not drop us a line? Call now on 029 2039 7554 to speak with one of our experts or get in touch online to request a FREE knotweed survey today.

Request a FREE Survey

At Taylor Weed Control, we’ve seen it all when it comes to Japanese knotweed, from minor infestations to all-out garden takeovers.

However, if you think you’ve had it bad when it comes to Japanese knotweed on your property, trust us when we say it could be a lot worse!

For the organisers of the 2012 Olympics, a widespread Japanese knotweed infestation on the chosen site of the London Games threatened the viability of the event altogether.

How so? Join us as we revisit the time when Japanese knotweed won gold and threatened the UK’s biggest sporting event of the century.

 

japanese knotweed olympics

 

An Olympic-Sized Problem

The crown jewel of the London 2012 Olympic Games was the aptly-named, Olympic Park – home to the awesome Olympic Stadium.

Purpose-built for the 2012 Olympics, the stunning venue provided the stage for the opening and closing ceremonies, as well as multiple record-breaking performances and memorable moments throughout the event.

However, prior to the Olympics, the site itself was ravaged by Japanese knotweed. In fact, JKW covered a colossal four hectares (approximately 10 acres) of land on site and presented huge structural worries long-term.

As a result of the knotweed presence, a detailed and thorough removal plan was implemented to treat the issue, taking four years to complete and costing around £70 million of the £9.3 billion total remediation cost.

 

A Flowering Legacy

The investment in comprehensive removal of the knotweed problem has undoubtedly paid off and the venue has since become home to Premier League football club, West Ham United.

Additionally, the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park has also gone on to host a range of other global sporting events, such as numerous 2015 Rugby World Cup games, the 2017 World Athletics Championships and Major League Baseball fixtures in 2019.

Meanwhile, the venue itself has also hosted huge performing artists - including the likes of Guns N’ Roses, AC/DC and The Rolling Stones - none of which would have been possible, had Japanese knotweed remained at large.

 

Knotweed Removal Specialists

While your back garden is unlikely to play host to a global sporting event or a legendary music icon, ridding your land of Japanese knotweed can help protect your property and its future value.

At Taylor Weed Control, we specialise in knotweed removal and have built a reputation as one of the leading Japanese knotweed removal specialists in Wales and the West of England.

Our crack team of trained experts are fully equipped with the skills to disqualify your Japanese knotweed and leave it for dust, leaving you with a knotweed free garden that’s fit and healthy.

 

For more information on the professional weed killer services at Taylor Weed Control, why not get in touch today? Call now on 029 2039 7554 or click the button below to get in touch online and request a FREE survey.

Request a FREE Survey

Highly invasive and rapidly expansive, Japanese knotweed is a problematic plant to find on any property and every effort should be made to avoid the spread of this wide-reaching weed.

However, recent reports from the Wildlife Trust provide a stark reminder that preventing the spread of Japanese knotweed can oftentimes be out of our control, particularly when heavy rainfall rears its head.

 

Japanese knotweed flooding

 

In Deep Water

According to Wildlife Trust workers and volunteers, a number of previously unaffected UK nature reserves surveyed by the organisation have now been found to contain Japanese knotweed rhizomes on site.

The discovery comes after bouts of notable flooding in Wildlife Trust areas, raising concerns that flooding issues could be contributing to the spread of the notorious plant.

 

A Growing Issue

Rotherham’s Woodhouse Washlands nature reserve is a prime example of this and the latest notable landscape to fall victim to the Nipponese knot.

Previously knotweed free, the site was found to have knotweed present after the nearby River Rother burst its banks following a pronounced spell of flooding. As a result of the flood, Woodhouse Washlands succumbed to 1.5 metres of surface water.

The Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs weighed in on the situation, noting that Japanese knotweed is notorious for spreading during times of flooding and that riverbanks should be monitored after bouts of prolonged heavy rainfall.

 

Professional Weed Removal

While prevention is often better than a cure, as seen in the example above, even the most stringent of precautionary measures can go awry if Mother Nature has her say in the matter.

Luckily, there are still a variety of ways to defend your property, even if knotweed has wormed its way on to your land and slipped by under the radar.

For an effective solution, professional knotweed removal is the best form of attack and a great way to ensure your problem is taken care of before it gets out of hand.

 

Knotweed Removal Specialists

With over 15 years’ industry experience in the weed removal trade, we’ve built a reputation as one of the UK’s foremost specialists in Japanese knotweed removal.

Our team of weed whacking warriors are ready, willing and more than able to untie your knotweed issues efficiently and effectively.

If you have discovered Japanese knotweed on your property, don’t stand idly by and let your unwanted guest move in on your patch. Call Taylor Weed Control now and nip it in the bud today!

 

For more detail on Japanese knotweed removal from Taylor Weed Control, why not drop us a line today? Call now on 029 2039 7554 or click the button below to request a FREE Japanese knotweed survey.

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