Have you spotted Japanese knotweed on your property and are worried you may be breaking the law by doing so? Well, don't worry, because it IS NOT a criminal offence to have Japanese knotweed on your property.

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During the autumn months, the majority of weeds and plants begin to die out and wilt with Japanese knotweed being no different. If you believe you have an infestation of knotweed on or near your property but are unsure and need confirmation, read on to find out what Japanese knotweed looks like in the autumn.

Japanese knotweed in autumn

Photo by Kenneth Allen

Identifying Japanese knotweed in the autumn 

When trying to identify Japanese knotweed during the autumn, the signs that you should be looking out for are: 

  • A very dense cluster of bamboo stems with a lot of foliage 
  • Plants that are approximately 2-3 meters high 
  • Leaves that are starting to turn yellow and are wilting 
  • Hollow bamboo-like stems that are beginning to turn from a reddish-brown into a darker shade of brown 
  • Leaves will contain a distinctive zigzag pattern on the stems 
  • The leaves will also have a distinctive heart-shape with a pointed tip and straightened edge
  • During late autumn the canes will begin to die off and the plant becomes dormant

During the autumn months, Japanese knotweed will look similar to that in late summer, so shouldn't be too hard to identify. During these months, however, Japanese knotweed begins to flower where nearly all of the plant's resources are transferred to its rhizomes, causing it to grow significantly. This presents the optimal time to treat and reduce further rhizome growth.

 

Japanese knotweed treatment in autumn 

If you're interested in how we work to treat Japanese knotweed during the autumn, take a look at our handy infographic below!

Do you require more information on Japanese knotweed during the autumn? Please feel free to get in touch with the Taylor Total Weed Control team today by filling out the form below - we'd be more than happy to help you out!

Advice for anyone who's buying or selling a house, flat or commercial property that has Japanese knotweed within the property boundaries (or nearby)

Mortgage agreement

If you find out that you have Japanese knotweed on or near your property, don't panic - it's not the end of the world!

Many people don't even know they have Japanese knotweed in their garden until they put the property on the market and the invasive weed is noticed by either the estate agent or building society surveyor.

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When Japanese knotweed is found on or near properties, it can pose an array of potentially expensive problems for a number of different parties. Firstly, homeowners that spot knotweed near their property may begin to worry about its far-reaching and invasive rhizomes growing through buildings and foundations causing hundreds, maybe thousands of pounds of structural damage.

Secondly, estate agents worry as Japanese knotweed near properties may pose a risk to potential sales. And lastly, property developers fear unbudgeted costs through knotweed treatment costs and site delays if not dealt with properly from the very start.

With all of these potential problems, it comes to no surprise that many people take to dealing with Japanese knotweed themselves, however, as knotweed becomes more problematic due to its ability to spread easily if managed incorrectly, much legislation on the management and removal of knotweed now exists. One of the most commonly asked questions surrounding knotweed and its removal is "can Japanese knotweed be burnt?

To make things easy to understand, the experts here at Taylor Total Weed Control are here to tell you. 

Can I Burn Japanese Knotweed

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One thing that all lawn care enthusiasts and homeowners can agree on is that weeds are a nuisance, especially the invasive and problematic type. However, not all weeds respond to dangerous chemical the same way. Many weeds are in fact resistant to herbicides and respond much better to different methods of control.

By understanding and utilising these different methods, you will be in the best possible position to eradicate all and any weeds that may start to crop up in and around your lawn. 

So, let's take a look at the different weed control methods that you can start using. 

Weed Control Methods

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It is agreed amongst professionals and experts that the invasive plant Japanese knotweed can cause problems to homes and properties as a result of its ability to grow and spread at an alarming rate. But can Japanese knotweed cause subsidence? Taylor Total Weed Control is here to help you find out! 

Before we can look into whether knotweed can cause subsidence, we must first try to understand what subsidence means. According to the Cambridge Dictionary, the term subsidence means 'the process by which land or buildings sink to a lower level'. Therefore, the understanding is whether Japanese knotweed possesses the ability to cause lands or buildings to sink, leading to extreme structural damage.

Many varying opinions exist on this topic, with some arguing that knotweed does cause subsidence and some arguing that it doesn't. We're here to offer our professional opinion on the matter to try and answer the questions as best we can as well as letting you know how Taylor Total Weed Control can help if you've spotted knotweed on or near your property and are worried about the potential damage it can cause.

Can Japanese Knotweed Cause Subsidence

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What to Do If You Find Japanese Knotweed Infographic

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The term "invasive species" may not sound very threatening, but these invaders, both large and small, can and do have devastating effects on wildlife and communities across the world.

What is an Invasive Species

Invasive species are one of the most threatening problems to native wildlife, with approximately 42% of endangered species at risk as a result of invasive species. Endangered species aren't the only things that are at risk due to invasive species, however, with economies and human health also susceptible to feel the effects. The impact that invasive species have on our natural ecosystems and economy cost billions each and every year, with many of our recreational, agricultural and commercial activities heavily reliant on healthy native ecosystems. 

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Do You Need a License to Remove Japanese Knotweed?

If you have spotted Japanese knotweed on or near your property and are wondering if you need a licence to remove it – in short, no you don’t,

The legal standing surrounding Japanese knotweed across the UK varies. In England and Wales, the primary legislation relating to knotweed is ‘Section 14(2) of the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981’. In Scotland, this is still the predominant piece of legislation but in effect has been superseded by the changes which came into force with the ‘Wildlife and Natural Environment (Scotland) Act 2012’. The law surrounding the management and control of knotweed across the UK, however, is practically the same.

Japanese knotweed is categorised as an invasive species, and it is the responsibility of the owner of the land where it appears to prevent it from spreading into neighbouring properties or into the wild. The removal of Japanese knotweed must also be performed with extreme due care and attention due to the sensitivity regarding its ability to spread. Currently, there is no legal obligation to remove or treat knotweed, just as long as you’re not encouraging or allow it to grow.

Guidelines set out by the government state that anyone wanting to use chemicals to treat an infestation of knotweed must do the some or all of the following:

  • Make sure anyone spraying holds a certificate of competence for herbicide use or works under the direct supervision of a certificate holder
  • Carry out a Control of Substances Hazardous to Health assessment
  • Get permission from Natural England if the area is protected, for example, sites of special scientific interest
  • Get permission from the Environment Agency if the plants are near water

The use of pesticides and chemicals in treating Japanese knotweed is governed by ‘The Control of Pesticides Regulations 1986’ and required any person who uses a pesticide to take all reasonable precautions to protect the health of human beings, creatures and plants. Once knotweed has been treated with chemicals, it will have to be disposed of in the correct way. Off-site disposals fall under the ‘Environmental Protection Act 1990’, which states disposing of Japanese knotweed must be conducted by a licensed waste carrier as stated in ‘Waste Regulations 2011’ and disposed of within a licensed facility. Relevant transfer notes must be completed and stored. If knotweed has not been treated before off-side disposal and simply removed, then it is not classed as hazardous waste. If certain pesticides have been used, however, then the waste moves into the hazardous category requiring a consignment note as set out in the ‘Hazardous Waste Regulations 2005’.

In 2013, the UK government stated that any person that fails to control Japanese knotweed along with other invasive weed could receive an anti-social behaviour order. On-the-spot fines of £100 can also be issued, potentially rising to £2500 if prosecuted. Companies also face fines of up to £20,000 if prosecuted

Professional Knotweed Removal

It is highly recommended that, if you have Japanese knotweed on or near your property, you use experienced professionals that know what they’re doing. If not, you risk allowing the knotweed’s rhizomes spreading even further, causing not only potential increases in damage later on in time but prosecution for facilitating the spread of knotweed. So, to avoid any of these issues, be sure to get in touch with the team here at Taylor Total Weed Control! Our Japanese knotweed specialist can identify and confirm the presence of knotweed on your property and devise a relevant plan of removal to ensure it is properly eradicated. You can learn more about our knotweed removal services below.

Japanese Knotweed Removal >

If you have any questions regarding our Japanese knotweed treatment or removal, then please do not hesitate to get in touch with us today!

Types of Weed Killer

With so many types of weed killer available on the market, it can become quite confusing when comes a time when you have to pick the right one. A range and variety of herbicides will more than likely have you scratching your head whilst looking at a wall of products standing in aisle six. To make things a little easier for you, we try to break down the main types of weed killer that you can buy, their characteristics and when they are suitable to use.

The types of weed killer include contact, systemic, residual, selective and non-selective. It’s important to note that before buying any type of weed killer, selecting and using the wrong type on your lawn or affected area can cause serious harm. Also, the most popular herbicide, ‘Roundup’, is a contact, systemic and non-selective weed killer.

 

Contact Weed Killers

As its name suggests, this type of weed killer kills weeds as soon as they come into contact with it. Here, the herbicide is consumed by the stomata (tiny openings) of the plant’s leaf. However, in order for the weed killer to be effective, the stomata need to be open. These are only open when the plant is actively growing and throughout the day whilst the process of photosynthesis is taking place. Therefore, contact weed killers need to be applied to the target plants during the growing season, to green, living foliage and early in the day. This gives the herbicide the whole duration of the day to work its way into the stomata.

Contact weed killers are used by many homeowners and lawn care enthusiasts as they have no impact on the garden soil surrounding the target plants. A popular type of contact herbicide is glyphosate, when applied, becomes locked inside soil particles, making it unavailable to plant root, resulting in it becoming redundant in the soil. Contact weed killers take approximately two weeks to take full effect and are a superb choice for tackling and controlling annual weeds. To manage perennial weeds, however, two or maybe three applications of contact herbicide are required.

 

Systemic Weed Killers

The majority of herbicides fall under the category of systemic weed killers. This means that on entry into the plant, the herbicide works its way through the plant’s transport system to target and kill all of its areas. An example of a systemic week killer in action would see it entering a plant through its foliage and working its way all the way down the plant until it reaches the roots, where it eventually kills the weed completely.

 

Residual Weed Killers

These type of weed killers are also referred to as soil acting weed killers. Careful consideration must be taken when selecting and using these herbicides as their application will poison the soil surrounding the target plant, rendering it inactive and useless for growing any further plants, weeds or flowers. The majority of residual weed killers sit in the soil for months, preventing any form of growth from taking place. However, lesser plants such as algae and lichens are not affected by these herbicides. The ideal areas to use residual week killers are hard-standing areas such as paths, driveways and patios and not areas where you may grow plants or vegetables in the near future.

 

Selective Weed Killers

These herbicides work to kill a particular plant whilst leaving surrounding soil and plants unharmed. For example, certain selective weed killers aim to only target broad-leaved plants such as buttercup, dandelion and daisy, whilst having zero effect on narrow-leaved plants such as grass. As the two types of plants are two early evolutionary divisions within the plant kingdom, they have two very different vascular and transport systems. Meaning selective herbicides can be created to target one of these two plant types.

 

Non-Selective Weed Killers

As you may have already guessed, non-selective weed killers are herbicides which work to kill everything that they come into contact with, similar to contact weed killers. Unlike contact herbicides, however, non-selective weed killers will kill or severely damage any and every plant that they touch. It is therefore extremely important to take extra care when using and applying this type of herbicide. Be sure to never spray during windy conditions, never walk over areas that may have been sprayed previously, cover plants that are near the target weed and handle chemicals and knapsacks sprayers with care.

Here at Taylor Total Weed Control, you’ll be glad to hear that we use appropriate weed killers whenever necessary. Matching both the weed type and the result that you’re looking to get. Our team of weed control specialists have years of training and experience in the use and application of herbicides, so you can rest assured knowing that your lawn or effected area will be in safe, professional hands.

To learn more about our weed control services, simply click below. You can also get in touch with a member of our team if you would like to enquire about weed control treatment on your property.

Our Weed Control Services >

Contact Taylor Weed Control

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