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Japanese knotweed can cause a lot of problems on your property so it's important you can identify it all year round! Now that we're moving into spring, you'll probably notice a lot of different plants emerging in your garden, so it's important to keep your eye out for Japanese knotweed. Left untreated, Japanese knotweed can damage your property and can even prevent you from selling your home. 

what does japanese knotweed look like in spring

Image source: Scottish Invasive Species Initiative (Flickr)

Knowing what Japanese knotweed looks like in the spring can help you save money on treatment, repairs, and lawsuits! That's right, people have been known to sue their neighbors if Japanese knotweed has been allowed to invade their property, so spotting and treating it early is a must!

Read More: What to do if your neighbour has knotweed

Japanese knotweed appears in spring

Most people see Japanese knotweed appear in the garden for the first time during spring. Like all plants, Japanese knotweed grows new shoots that grow up through the soil when the weather starts to get warmer. 

Japanese knotweed in spring

Initially, Japanese knotweed spears will appear. They're red/purple in colour and look very similar to asparagus, with a woody stem and a pointed tip. During spring, the leaves of the Japanese knotweed plant are curled up (they're still very young at this point). 

By the end of spring, these small canes can be up to 3 metres high! Japanese knotweed grows quickly, which is another reason why you should keep your eye out for it during spring. 

Japanese knotweed in summer

If by chance, you don't notice the Japanese knotweed in your garden in summer, you might have a chance to spot it in summer before it spreads too far!

During summer, Japanese knotweed has a lot more foliage, it appears green and leafy with only a few speckles of red/purple left on the stem.

When Japanese knotweed eventually flowers, it has small creamy white flowers, which ironically, are quite pretty. Unfortunately, these little white flowers are a sign of an underlying problem that needs to be dealt with quickly. 

Head to our Japanese knotweed Identification page for more information!

Japanese Knotweed Identification >

Remember to check the plants in your garden regularly during spring and summer. If you spot anything that looks like Japanese knotweed, you should get it checked by Japanese knotweed specialists immediately. Contact us for a Japanese knotweed survey now!

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Here at Taylor Total Weed Control, we offer two different types of surveys depending on the level of information that you need. A basic survey will help you identify whether you have Japanese knotweed or not, while our in-depth survey will give you a wealth of information about the problem.

japanese knotweed survey

Basic Japanese Knotweed Survey

This Japanese knotweed survey is supplied to you free of charge*. It will tell you whether or not there is Japanese knotweed on the site and it will tell you the different prices for our treatment options.

*This survey is free of charge unless there are high travel costs to get to the site.

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Property tax

Chancellor Rishi Sunak today confirmed that the stamp duty holiday for home buyers in England and Northern Ireland - previously slated to end on 31 March - will be extended for another three months.

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Japanese knotweed

First introduced to the UK in the 19th century, Japanese knotweed has become a widespread issue for many people across the country. Brought here from Asia as an ornamental plant and cattle fodder, knotweed was reported as a garden escape in the late 19th century which eventually naturalised populations in the early 20th century. Fast forward to the present day and knotweed can be found all over the UK, causing tremendous amounts of structural and environmental damage across many cities and towns.

So, where does Japanese knotweed grow and where are the areas that you're most likely to find it? Read on to find out!

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Knotweed with white flowers

Japanese knotweed frequently causes house sales to fall through. This problematic plant tends to make mortgage providers very nervous indeed, and it's common for lenders to pull out when a surveyor discovers Fallopia japonica within (or near) the property's boundaries.

Can I Get a Mortgage on a Property with Japanese Knotweed?

A customer of ours in Caerphilly recently experienced this first hand. Paul Flynn thought he had found a buyer for his property, but his good mood was spoiled when the other party's surveyor reported that there was Japanese knotweed within a few metres of the house. The lender warned that, unless Mr Flynn sought a comprehensive treatment plan (complete with an insurance-backed guarantee), the transaction would not go ahead.

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Man looking at watch

Time is running out for buyers in England and Northern Ireland to complete their purchases before the stamp duty holiday ends on 31 March 2021. Any deals concluded after that deadline will be subject to the lower threshold for Stamp Duty Land Tax; at present, buyers only pay SDLT on properties worth £500,000 or more, but at the end of March, the tax will apply to residential properties worth £125,000 or more.

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Because Japanese knotweed is such a big problem here in the UK, there are strict laws in place to limit the spread of this invasive plant species. But what exactly are these laws, and when were they introduced?

House of Commons chamber

Image source: Wikimedia Commons

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Japanese knotweed (Fallopia japonica)

Every living thing known to man has a Latin name that should be used when referring to that species in a formal scientific context. For example, human beings are Homo sapiens, polar bears are Ursus maritimus, and the common sunflower is Helianthus annuus.

In theory, these scientific names are internationally recognised - what you call a 'dog' is called a 'chien' in France and a 'koira' in Finland, but biologists in all three countries should understand what Canis lupus familiaris means.

So what is the proper name for Japanese knotweed? Read a few articles online, and you may notice that different sources use different Latin names when referring to this pesky plant - Fallopia japonica and Reynoutria japonica are the most common, but Polygonum cuspidatum and various other monikers pop up from time to time as well.

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Property with a garden

In a recent interview with the Daily Express, property expert Ray Harriot advised that sellers should tell the truth about Japanese knotweed on their property - even if this would complicate the transaction.

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Japanese knotweed

Recent studies suggest that Japanese knotweed could be more effective than antibiotics at treating Lyme disease!

Lyme disease is a tick-borne infection that is known to cause numerous unpleasant effects including meningitis, face paralysis, heart palpitations and severe headaches. While people think that Lyme disease is fairly uncommon, there are over 365,000 new cases of it in the USA and Europe alone.

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