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lockdown weeds

There are so many things that have been neglected because of coronavirus through no fault of their own. Sadly, weeds in public spaces are one of them! Usually, council workers would make weed control one of their top priorities in the run-up to spring/summer, but a lot of the workers have been required to provide other, more essential services so the weeds have been left to grow wild. 

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If you're a keen gardener, you probably know that plants are capable of reproducing in numerous different ways. Most commonly, plants reproduce using seeds, but some species propagate a different way - by producing bulbils

lilies

What are bulbils?

Bulbils are small nodules that appear on stem of an existing plant, sometimes in place of a flower. These nodules contain the exact same genetic material as the parent plant, so put simply, bulbils are a clone of their parents! This form of reproduction is asexual, so the plant didn't need to be fertilised by the pollen on a passing bee in order to create offspring.

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Brambles, often known as a blackberry bush, is a thorny bush that produces berries that are commonly used to make pies and jam. Doesn't sound too bad right? Well, you'll be surprised to hear that brambles actually cause a lot of problems for homeowners when they begin growing in their gardens.

Similar to other types of weed such as Japanese knotweed, brambles have the ability to grow and spread at a rapid pace, particularly in gardens that are left unmanaged. Brambles can grow through shrubs and hedges and even between the cracks in broken brickwork and concrete, wreaking havoc on nearby buildings. If uncontrolled, bramble shoots can grow up to 8ft long and when they touch the nearby soil, they send out further shoots which quickly grow into a dense, thorny bush starting the process all over again. One single bramble shoot can quickly become a thorny jungle which is very difficult to firstly control and secondly eradicate once established.

So, how do you get rid of brambles in your garden once this happens? Let's find out...

Bramble in garden

 

Ways to remove bramble from your garden

To effectively remove brambles form your garden after they have established, you can do either of the following options:

  1. Use a systemic weedkiller 
  2. Dig out the roots

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do weeds kill grass

Whether you're new to gardening or a green-fingered garden enthusiast, you'll understand how infuriating it can be to try and prevent weeds from popping up on your lawn. Dandelions, daisies and thistles galore, every spring we're faced with a new bout of weeds that just don't want to budge. But are these weeds bad for your grass?

The short answer is yes, they are. In fact, they can compete with your grass on such an extreme level during the warmer months that you'll be left with sparse, brown patches all over the grass before winter. Weeds are well known for spreading their seeds and quickly taking over large areas of your lawn, so they must be stopped!

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One thing that all lawn care enthusiasts and homeowners can agree on is that weeds are a nuisance, especially the invasive and problematic type. However, not all weeds respond to dangerous chemical the same way. Many weeds are in fact resistant to herbicides and respond much better to different methods of control.

By understanding and utilising these different methods, you will be in the best possible position to eradicate all and any weeds that may start to crop up in and around your lawn. 

So, let's take a look at the different weed control methods that you can start using. 

Weed Control Methods

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Artificial Grass

You might be surprised to read this, but artificial grass is not immune to weeds. True, a fake lawn requires less maintenance than a real one, but going artificial doesn't necessarily mean that you'll never have to worry about weeds again.

As a general rule, you will only ever notice weeds growing around the edge of your artificial lawn, although it is possible for weeds to push through from beneath - especially if your fake grass was installed without a weed-resistant membrane.

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Lawn with dandelions and other weeds

So your lawn is looking a little crowded these days. Dandelions, hairy bittercress and a selection of other common lawn weeds have made your garden their home, and your lovely green grass must now compete with all sorts of other plants for water and essential nutrients.

Clearly, some anti-weed measures are in order. But how do you kill those pesky weeds without killing your grass too?

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Types of Weed Killer

With so many types of weed killer available on the market, it can become quite confusing when comes a time when you have to pick the right one. A range and variety of herbicides will more than likely have you scratching your head whilst looking at a wall of products standing in aisle six. To make things a little easier for you, we try to break down the main types of weed killer that you can buy, their characteristics and when they are suitable to use.

The types of weed killer include contact, systemic, residual, selective and non-selective. It’s important to note that before buying any type of weed killer, selecting and using the wrong type on your lawn or affected area can cause serious harm. Also, the most popular herbicide, ‘Roundup’, is a contact, systemic and non-selective weed killer.

 

Contact Weed Killers

As its name suggests, this type of weed killer kills weeds as soon as they come into contact with it. Here, the herbicide is consumed by the stomata (tiny openings) of the plant’s leaf. However, in order for the weed killer to be effective, the stomata need to be open. These are only open when the plant is actively growing and throughout the day whilst the process of photosynthesis is taking place. Therefore, contact weed killers need to be applied to the target plants during the growing season, to green, living foliage and early in the day. This gives the herbicide the whole duration of the day to work its way into the stomata.

Contact weed killers are used by many homeowners and lawn care enthusiasts as they have no impact on the garden soil surrounding the target plants. A popular type of contact herbicide is glyphosate, when applied, becomes locked inside soil particles, making it unavailable to plant root, resulting in it becoming redundant in the soil. Contact weed killers take approximately two weeks to take full effect and are a superb choice for tackling and controlling annual weeds. To manage perennial weeds, however, two or maybe three applications of contact herbicide are required.

 

Systemic Weed Killers

The majority of herbicides fall under the category of systemic weed killers. This means that on entry into the plant, the herbicide works its way through the plant’s transport system to target and kill all of its areas. An example of a systemic week killer in action would see it entering a plant through its foliage and working its way all the way down the plant until it reaches the roots, where it eventually kills the weed completely.

 

Residual Weed Killers

These type of weed killers are also referred to as soil acting weed killers. Careful consideration must be taken when selecting and using these herbicides as their application will poison the soil surrounding the target plant, rendering it inactive and useless for growing any further plants, weeds or flowers. The majority of residual weed killers sit in the soil for months, preventing any form of growth from taking place. However, lesser plants such as algae and lichens are not affected by these herbicides. The ideal areas to use residual week killers are hard-standing areas such as paths, driveways and patios and not areas where you may grow plants or vegetables in the near future.

 

Selective Weed Killers

These herbicides work to kill a particular plant whilst leaving surrounding soil and plants unharmed. For example, certain selective weed killers aim to only target broad-leaved plants such as buttercup, dandelion and daisy, whilst having zero effect on narrow-leaved plants such as grass. As the two types of plants are two early evolutionary divisions within the plant kingdom, they have two very different vascular and transport systems. Meaning selective herbicides can be created to target one of these two plant types.

 

Non-Selective Weed Killers

As you may have already guessed, non-selective weed killers are herbicides which work to kill everything that they come into contact with, similar to contact weed killers. Unlike contact herbicides, however, non-selective weed killers will kill or severely damage any and every plant that they touch. It is therefore extremely important to take extra care when using and applying this type of herbicide. Be sure to never spray during windy conditions, never walk over areas that may have been sprayed previously, cover plants that are near the target weed and handle chemicals and knapsacks sprayers with care.

Here at Taylor Total Weed Control, you’ll be glad to hear that we use appropriate weed killers whenever necessary. Matching both the weed type and the result that you’re looking to get. Our team of weed control specialists have years of training and experience in the use and application of herbicides, so you can rest assured knowing that your lawn or effected area will be in safe, professional hands.

To learn more about our weed control services, simply click below. You can also get in touch with a member of our team if you would like to enquire about weed control treatment on your property.

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Are you asking yourself the question - "can I grow bamboo in my garden?" You're in the right place, today we're going to answer all of your bamboo growing questions!

British homeowners are being warned to not grow bamboo in their garden due to the potential dangers that the oriental plant can bring, with experts likening the effects of bamboo to the notorious Japanese knotweed.

Due to its screening capabilities and use within outdoor privacy measure, bamboo is an extremely popular choice for homeowners up and down the country, particularly within urban areas. However, its abilities to become highly invasive and out of control mean it can cause unpredictable and irreversible damage. Which, unfortunately, was the case for one homeowner in Reading.

The unnamed homeowner was forced to unearth her entire garden after bamboo grew to several metres in height and began to spread right across her garden towards her property, damaging her patio in the process.

Various forms of bamboo exist, namely ‘clumping’ and running’ that can have negative effects on surrounding areas. In this case, the ‘running’ bamboo found within the homeowner’s garden started to grow a large network of root and ‘rhizomes’, wreaking havoc on the property.

The rhizomes of bamboo are capable of spreading up to 30ft and if left untreated, can spread across and invade neighbouring property posing a huge threat to the foundations of homes.

Just like Japanese knotweed, bamboo has the ability to strangle plots of land as a result of its capability to damage property, breach brick, patios and cause cracks in concrete. It is known to thrive in a variety of soils, environments and temperatures with little to no maintenance.

Experts have stated that if you do choose to house bamboo on your property to make sure you choose a clumping variety as opposed to the running types. It is also a good idea to ‘place it within a pot or bed which is lined with strong vertical root barrier designed to contain bamboo.’

A retired couple from Reading has said they were mis-sold their bamboo by a local nursery, stating they were promised it would not grow further than waist height and would not spread. However, the bamboo shot up and out damaging both the patio and approaching house.

Professional Removal Services

So to answer your question - "can I grow bamboo in my garden?" The answer is yes, but do so with caution! If you're worried about the effects of spreading bamboo, you might want to avoid growing it. However, Japanese knotweed is infinitely more concerning if it appears in your garden!

To ensure you’re not affected by the damaging effects of bamboo or Japanese knotweed, contact us to talk about professional removal. If you have spotted bamboo or knotweed on or near your property and want to act fast before major damage can be caused, then please do not hesitate to get in touch with a member of the Taylor Total Weed Control team. We have a number of treatment plans available for you to choose from.

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Giant hogweed

While it may sound more like something from a Harry Potter movie than a garden-dwelling pest, giant hogweed is far from a magical presence in your garden.

In fact, giant hogweed has the ability to cause serious damage, particularly if it comes into contact with human skin.

To keep you and your loved ones safe, here's everything you need to know about giant hogweed.

 

What is Giant Hogweed?

As the name suggests, giant hogweed has the ability to reach heights of over 3 metres, adorned in large, leafy stems and topped with white flowery clusters that are umbrella-like in appearance.

While it may be pleasing to the eye, don't let its innocent appearance fool you - it's hiding some serious dangers beneath its looks.

Originating in the Caucasus Mountains and Central Asia, this troublesome weed made its way over to the UK in the 19th century as an ornamental addition, much like Japanese knotweed.

However, unlike Japanese knotweed, giant hogweed can pose a variety of physical dangers as well as horticultural headaches.

 

Dangers of Giant Hogweed

A detailed description of giant hogweed makes it sound like some sort of sci-fi monster. In addition to its daunting height, it's also covered in fibrous hairs and coated in toxic sap. The sap itself is an extreme irritant which can burn the skin and even lead to potential sight loss if it gets in your eyes.

If the skin comes into contact with giant hogweed sap, the toxic substance reacts with sunlight to cause photodermatitis, leading to a red rash with painful blistering and scarring a common consequence.

 

Removing Giant Hogweed

As a foreign plant with strongly invasive tendencies, giant hogweed is classed as an invasive species, with a variety of legislation placed upon this harmful plant in order to control it.

Giant hogweed is even listed in the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981, meaning it's actually an offence to cause giant hogweed to grow in the wild in England and Wales.

If you find giant hogweed on your property, it's strongly advised you contact a specialist to conduct professional removal of the weed ASAP.

Attempting removal without expert knowledge can be dangerous. Cut plant debris and even contaminated clothing and tools used to remove it can still prove hazardous.

For safe eradication of giant hogweed from your property, call Taylor Total Weed Control today on 029 2039 7554 and cut your giant invader down to size without feeling the burn.

Contact Taylor Total Weed Control

Contact Taylor Weed Control

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